The Blog, Next in Lisp

Here's a crazy idea: in addition to posting an RSS feed, say I start posting the content of the blog as Common Lisp code. Not, to replace any format that I currently publish in, but as an additional output option. Entries might look something like this:

(tychoish:blog-post
   (tychoish:meta-data
      :title "The Blog, Next in Lisp"
      :author "tycho garen"
      :pubtime #'(format () time-t)
      (tychoish:blog-tags '(lisp cyborg crazy))
      (tychoish:archive-collection '(programing)))
  (tychoish:blog-content (markdown)
    "Here's a crazy idea: in addition to posting an RSS feed, say I start
    posting the content of the blog as Common Lisp code. Not, to replace
    any format that I currently publish in, but as an additional output
    option. Entries might look something like this: [...]"))

That's pretty. In a lispy story of way. I'm not sure that it's actually correct, and it makes calls to functions that don't exist, of course. But I hope you can get the gist enough to see where I'm going with this, and maybe enough to correct my newbish mistakes.

By my count there needs to be functions for: blog-post, meta-data, blog-tags, blog-content, and markdown. And of course it's missing some notion of what these functions might do. I'm not terribly sure what they could do, build a better indexing system for the site (lord knows I need it), or more easily create a Lisp-based content reader/browser thatls like a feed reader but more in some way that I haven't envisioned.

In a lot of ways, this isn't any different from RSS. And it is RSS, basically, except you don't have to parse it into some format that your programing language can understand, (assuming you're programing with Lisp, of course, but you are, aren't you?) because it is your programing language. At least in my mind this has a lot in common with the Sygn Project in that both projects focus on providing some sort of loose standard that allow us to share and use data openly and freely, using formats that are easy (enough) to construct by hand, are human readable, and easy to process and use programatically.

In any case, it shouldn't be terribly hard to generate this format, the question is: does seeing the data like this present possiblities to anyone? And, while we're at it, if anyone wants to help define some of the more basic functions, that might be awesome. I look forward to hearing from you all?

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