What is it That You Do?

The longer that I have this job, the more difficult it is to explain what I do. I say, "I'm a programmer," and you'd think that I write code all day, but that doesn't map onto what my days look like, and the longer it seems the less code I actually end up writing. I think the complexity of this seemingly simple question grows from the fact that building software involves a lot more than writing code, particularly as projects become more complex.

I'd venture to say that most code is written and maintained by one person, and typically used by a very small number of pepole (often on behalf of many more people,) though this is difficult to quantify. Single maintainer software is still software, and there are lots of interesting problems, but as much as anything else I'm interested in the problems adjacent to multi-author code-bases and multi-operator software development. [1]

Fundamentally, I'm interested in the following questions:

  • How can (sometimes larger) groups of people collaborate to build something that's bigger than the scope of any of their work?
  • How can we build software in a way that lets individual developers focus most of the time on the features and concerns that are the most important to them and their users. [2]

The software development process, regardless of the scope of the problem, has a number of different aspects:

  • Operations: How does is this software execute and how do we know that its successful when it runs?
  • Behavior: What does it do, and how do we ensure it has the correct behavior?
  • Interface: How will users interact with the process, and how do we ensure a consistent experience across versions and users' environment?
  • Product: Who are the users? What features do they want? Which features are the most important?

Sometimes we can address these questions by writing code, but often there's a lot of talking to users, other developers, and other people who work in software development organizations (e.g. product managers, support, etc.) not to mention writing a lot of English (documentation, specs, and the like.)

I still don't think that I've successfully answered the framing question, except to paint a large picture of what kinds of work goes into making software, and described some of my specific domain interests. This ends up boiling down to:

  • I write a lot of documents describing new features and improvements to our software. [product]
  • I think a lot about how our product works as it grows (scaling), and what kinds of changes we can make now to make that process more smooth. [operations]
  • How can I help the more junior members of my team focus on the aspects of their jobs that they enjoy the most, and help illustrate broader contexts to them. [mentoring]
  • How can we take the problems we're solving today and build the solution that balances the immediate requirements with longer term maintainability and reuse. [operations/infrastructure]

The actual "what" I'm spending my time boils down to reading a bunch of code, meeting with my teamates, meeting with users (who are also coworkers.) And sometimes writing code. If I'm lucky.

[1]I think the single-author and/or single-operator class is super interesting and valuable, particularly because it includes a lot of software outside of the conventional disciplinary boundaries of software and includes things like macros, spreadsheets, small scale database, and IT/operations ("scripting") work.
[2]It's very easy to spend most of your time as a developer writing infrastructure code of some sort, to address either internal concerns (logging, data management and modeling, integrating with services) or project/process automation (build, test, operations) concerns. Infrastructure isn't bad, but it isn't the same as working on product features.
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